• March 5, 2014The Death of the PAT

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    • by ed
    The end of the Extra Point is closer than you think.

    Let's be honest here – the Extra Point kick is boring, a vestigial organ from the NFL's hayday. It's a ~20 yard chipshot that was only missed 5 times last year – a success rate of 99.6%. Today's kickers, like players in every position, are quantam leaps ahead of their predecessors – so much so that the extra point kick is but an afterthought, a temporary stoppage in the action. And get this: the NFL agrees. The NFL thinks that the EP kick is so useless that they are considering significantly altering it, and even abolishing it altogether.

    According to this article on NFL.com -

    "NFL Media's Judy Battista reports the NFL Competition Committee is in preliminary talks about placing the ball at the 25-yard line for the point-after attempt. That would make the extra point a 43-yard attempt."

    Now wouldn't that be a doozy? A 43 yard extra point attempt? This is still easily within the range of today's kickers, but the success rate drops from 99.6/100 to 83/100. And check this out – if you miss it, you lose points. Roger Goodell has proposed the following rule change: If you score a touchdown, you get 7 points. You can take your 7 points and walk off the field. However, if you want a bit more – you can try the 43 yard extra point. Should you be succesful, you walk off the field with 8 points total. If you miss, though – you only get 6. Not only does this add a huge new tactical element to the ball game, but it also changes the value placed on kickers. It sounds like this could signal the end of the PAT and the 2PC.

    Change isn't always a bad thing, my friends.

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